Official says vaccine expected in January, countering Trump

FILE - In this March 3, 2020 file photo, Health and Human Services Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response Dr. Robert Kadlec testifies before a Senate Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on the coronavirus on Capitol Hill in Washington. Kadlec said in an email Friday, Oct. 9, that the Trump administration “is accelerating production of safe and effective vaccines ... to ensure delivery starting January 2021." (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
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A Trump administration official leading the response to the coronavirus pandemic says the U.S. can expect delivery of a vaccine starting in January 2021, despite statements from the president that inoculations could begin this month.

U.S. medical supply chains failed, and COVID deaths followed

Lori Gonzalez, left, and Rachel Spray carry flowers to the temporary grave marker of Gonzalez's sister and Kaiser Permanente Fresno Medical Center nurse, Sandra Oldfield, at the Sanger Cemetery in Sanger, Calif., Saturday, Aug. 29, 2020. Oldfield died after being exposed to the novel coronavirus. Workers at the hospital said they did not have the proper personal protective equipment. (AP Photo/Gary Kazanjian)
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Depleted national stockpile contributed to COVID PPE shortage

Fred Leighty, warehouse manager at Oklahoma's Strategic National Stockpile warehouse, walks through the warehouse Tuesday, April 7, 2020, in Oklahoma City. In the warehouse are roughly four million pairs of gloves, 120 thousand gowns, 173 thousand face shields and goggles, 900 thousand surgical and medical masks, 110 thousand respirators and a variety of other personal protections equipment. The actual numbers vary as more supplies arrive and are shipped out daily. The new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms for most people, but for some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness or death. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
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Scarcity of key material squeezes medical mask manufacturing

In this undated photo provided by Outdoor Research in September 2020, a worker adjusts material on a machine that makes surgical masks in Seattle. As the city became a major coronavirus hotspot, the clothing and sportswear company also switched gears. (Gerardo Villalobos/Outdoor Research via AP)
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US bets on small, untested company to deliver COVID vaccine

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Counterfeit Masks Reaching Frontline Health Workers in U.S.

The exterior of Chinese factory Shanghai Dasheng is shown May 6, 2020 in Shanghai, China. An Associated Press investigation has found millions of medical masks, gloves, gowns and other supplies being used in hospitals across the country are counterfeits, putting lives at risk. (FRONTLINE/PBS/GRC via AP)
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Groups used to serving desperately poor nations now help US

In this March 31, 2020 photo, a Samaritan's Purse crew erects privacy tents at a 68 bed emergency field hospital specially equipped with a respiratory unit in New York's Central Park, in New York. International charity groups which usually provide support to war-torn or impoverished countries are now sending humanitarian aid to some of the wealthiest places in the United States to help manage the coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
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Charities face growing need in pandemic without volunteers

Mary Carter, 63, waits in a queue outside St. Stephen Outreach to collect food donations in the Brooklyn borough of New York, on Friday, March 20, 2020. For decades, American nonprofits have relied on a cadre of volunteers who quite suddenly aren't able to show up. With millions staying home during the pandemic, charities that help the country's neediest are facing even greater need. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)
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Relief package billions can’t buy hospitals out of shortages

In this March 12, 2020, file photo, health care personnel test a person in the passenger seat of a car for coronavirus at a Kaiser Permanente medical center parking lot in San Francisco. The Associated Press has found that the critical shortage of testing swabs, protective masks, surgical gowns and hand sanitizer can be tied to a sudden drop in imports of medical supplies. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
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Key medical glove factories cutting staff 50% amid virus

Volunteers Keshia Link, left, and Dan Peterson unload boxes of donated gloves and alcohol wipes from a car at a drive-up donation site for medical supplies at the University of Washington to help fight the coronavirus outbreak Tuesday, March 24, 2020, in Seattle. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
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Imports of medical supplies plummet as demand in US soars

In this March 17, 2020, photo, Theresa Malijan, a registered nurse, has hand sanitizer applied on her hands after removing her gloves after she took a nasopharyngeal swab from a patient at a drive-thru COVID-19 testing station for University of Washington Medicine patients in Seattle. The Associated Press has found that the critical shortage of testing swabs, protective masks, surgical gowns and hand sanitizer can be tied to a sudden drop in imports of medical supplies. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
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